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MOR Compost Cover Technology

Image: A: Air is released throughout the heap in intervals using a 6" pipe.  This pumps necessary oxygen to the critters that aid in decomposition.
B: Oxygen is released.
C: Moisture is both contained and released.
D: Carbon Dioxide molecules escape.
E: Micro-organisms accelerate decomposition.
F: Heat is trapped.
G: Odor is contained.

A: Air is released throughout the heap in intervals using a 6" pipe. This pumps necessary oxygen to the critters that aid in decomposition.
B: Oxygen is released.
C: Moisture is both contained and released.
D: Carbon Dioxide molecules escape.
E: Micro-organisms accelerate decomposition.
F: Heat is trapped.
G: Odor is contained.


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A triple layer, super cover

MOR (Managed Organic Recycling) has led the way in developing a triple layer composting cover that contains odors while improving the quality of the recycled soil. Its odor-reducing cover makes pile-maintenance pleasant and composting a bearable process for the surrounding community.

How composting works

A basic understanding of the composting process helps produce a high quality product and prevents many common problems.

Microorganisms that do the composting work have a few basic requirements. Composting is an aerobic process, so it occurs in the presence of oxygen that must combine with water and temperature to create a good composting environment.

Oxygen is provided in two ways: (1) by turning the compost; (2) by building the pile correctly. If a pile gets too little oxygen, it could give off offensive odors.

Microorganisms need water. But too wet, and anaerobic conditions result; too dry, and the decomposition process slows way down.

Bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms get their energy from carbon sources, such as leaves, brush, or wood chips.

Nitrogen is required for growth, but too much nitrogen can generate ammonia and other odors, and pollute runoff water.

As microorganisms decompose waste, they generate heat. Turning the pile when temperatures reach a certain point prevents overheating, that can result in drastic population fluctuations and odors. Eventually, the microorganisms will use up most of the readily decomposable waste and the composting process will slow. Temperatures drop and the compost takes on a dark texture. At this point, the compost can be placed in large stockpiles to cure and continue improving until ready for use.

How the MOR cover works

The MOR compost cover keeps odor, heat, microorganisms and some moisture contained while releasing oxygen, bits of carbon monoxide and some moisture.

This complex cover material allows the covered piles to be controlled with a blow fan, connected to a ventilated air hose snaking beneath the pile. The fan is necessary since the pile should never be cooler than 110º or warmer than 160º.

If the pile’s temperature falls below 110º, microorganisms needed to decompose the pile will never grow. If it climbs above 160º, microorganisms will not survive.

The MOR compost cover allows airflow to be decreased if the pile is not hot enough or increased if the pile begins getting too warm. This is done by simply adjusting the fan’s output using a torque timer.

A torque timer can be set so the fan blows air throughout the pile every 10 minutes and then stays off for 10 minutes before turning on again.

You can adjust the timer to the setting that works best for your pile. The pile’s size, ingredients used, weather and life of the pile will dictate the most suitable settings for a specific pile.

MOR’s Power Point Presentation

Image: Since 2007 MOR has provided the composting industry with consulting services and equipment to process organic waste materials into a nutrient rich soil amendment product.  MOR recommends the covered ASP technology to reduce the time required by as much as 50% over conventional windrow composting methods. The covered ASP system consists of a membrane cover and positive aeration system to supply oxygen to the microbes and control temperatures and moisture for efficient/rapid composting. MOR also provides an automated control system to manage temperatures and report results to regulatory agencies.

Since 2007 MOR has provided the composting industry with consulting services and equipment to process organic waste materials into a nutrient rich soil amendment product. MOR recommends the covered ASP technology to reduce the time required by as much as 50% over conventional windrow composting methods. (Continued…)

Composting Solutions

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The “School & Institutional Composting Solution” diagram above was conceived by Mike Schmauch and Endorsed by MOR’s owner John Bouey. Demonstrating step-by-step, this creative composting process shows how to start a composting project for your organization or school that will do as much for the environment as it will for the youngsters. (Continued…)